Tom Maund, Fire Chief
216-433-1214
17401 Holland Road
Brook Park, Ohio 44142
P: 216-433-1214 F: 216-433-1445
      


When experiencing an emergency, dial 911
For informational purposes call 216-433-1214.

We are currently operating out of one fire station at 17401 Holland Road. We currently have one Fire Chief, one Assistant Chief and one Fire Prevention Officer. We also have six Lieutenants and twenty-four Fire Fighter / Paramedics. Could you please make the corrections.

The Brook Park Fire Department consists of the Fire Chief, Assistant Fire Chief, Fire Prevention Officer, 6 Lieutenants, and 24 Fire Fighters.

The Fire Station (Fire Station 3) is located at 17401 Holland Road.

The Fire Department offers excellent fire protection, as well as 24-hour emergency ambulance service; the rescue squad operation is a Paramedic Unit, staffed by State Certified Paramedics. All ambulances have the capability for voice and data transfer communications with emergency room physicians. The emergency department of Southwest General – University Hospital provides medical direction and patient care protocols. The Emergency Medical Service department of the hospital coordinates medical education for the Fire Division members. Transportation is available to Southwest General Health Center, Parma General, Fairview General and Kaiser Permanente Hospitals.

All division members are state certified firefighters. 31 members of the division are certified at the level of Paramedic with the remainder certified at the Emergency Medical Technician level. The Brook Park Fire Department responds to more than 2650 emergency calls annually. Several Fire Division members are certified instructors and assist in training programs for local professional and civic groups.

The Fire Department regularly inspects all commercial buildings in the City for fire and safety hazards which include the Ford Motor Engine facility, and NASA’s Glenn Research Center. There are two members assigned full time to fire inspection and investigation.

In addition, Brook Park Fire Department works closely with area fire departments. Besides our mutual aid agreements, We have joined forces with nineteen area communities to form a Regional Technical Rescue Team. This highly trained team called the Southwest Emergency Response Team or S.E.R.T. consists of fire department members from all 19 communities. Specialized equipment is stored throughout the area, ready to be used when any of the technical disciplines are needed. Those disciplines are the Hazardous Materials Team, the High Angle Rope Rescue Team, the Confined Space Team, the Trench rescue Team and the Water Rescue Team. Check out S.E.R.T.’s website at www.sertohio.com

An annual fire hydrant maintenance program is conducted each Spring. This includes flushing, greasing hydrants, and their caps and stems. This program insures that the hydrants are in working order and that the water available from the hydrant is of sufficient quantity should a fire occur nearby. After the hydrants are tested, you may experience rusty water in your home for a short period of time. While this a minor inconvenience, it is necessary to test the hydrants to insure that they will operate correctly in case of a fire. For daily update information on which streets we are currently working on, follow us on Twitter.com at BrookParkFire

The Fire Department strives to serve you, our residents, to the best of their ability. If you require fire or ambulance services please call the Emergency Number 911. For all other purposes, please call 433-1214.


From the Newsletter:

The Brook Park Fire Department would like to stress the importance of having your home’s heating system checked annually by a qualified professional. Furnaces, fireplaces, wood stoves and their chimneys should be inspected and cleaned prior to the start of every heating season.
Be certain that alternate sources of heating, such as portable and kerosene heaters and wood burning stoves, are used according to their instructions and with extreme caution. For any space heater, remember: SPACE HEATERS NEED SPACE – at least three feet from anything that can burn.

Emergency Contact Info:

Do you know Ohio was the first state in the US that allows you to voluntarily provide Emergency Contact Information within the records of your Ohio Drivers License or Ohio State ID? Why is this important to you? It’s important because it is difficult for law enforcement to find your family members if you are hurt and can’t tell them who to call!

  • If you are injured, and unable to speak, the only info law enforcement has to find your loved ones is the address on your drivers license
  • Is someone always at that address?
  • Average time to unite loved ones is SIX hours
  • Voluntarily providing your Emergency Contact Information means First Responders can find your loved ones in minutes, not HOURS
  • It’s FREE, SECURE, and takes just a couple of minutes

Go to www.MyEmergencyContactInfo.org or www.ohiobmv.com to enter your emergency contact information.

Emergency Preparedness Manual

Emergency Preparedness Manual

This Manual is being provided to the residents and businesses of the City of Brook Park to educate you in the event of an emergency. Please take a few moments to read and then practice the emergency preparedness information in this manual. Protecting the well being of your family and property during an emergency begins with you and your family being prepared. Together, our safety forces, combined with your cooperation in preparing for such an event, will make a major difference in saving lives, reducing injuries and protecting property.

Downloads:

After The Fire

False Alarms

Fire Alarm System Permit Application

Fire Sprinkler System Permit Application

Generic Fire Prevention Application

Hood Suppression System Permit Application

Hydrant Permit Application
Hydrant Permission & Use Forms
(Must be downloaded together)

Inspections & Fees

Key Box Required

Notice of Privacy

Recreational Fire Rules

Tank Installation or Removal Application

Tent Permit Application

Spray Booth Mix Room Suppression System Permit Application

Programs:

ALUMINUM CANS FOR BURNED CHILDREN (ACBC)- Please save and drop off your aluminum cans behind your local Fire Station. The proceeds are used for fire safety education (Fire Safety Smoke House) at the schools, outings for burned children at Camp Phoenix in Bath, Ohio. Also funds are used to buy non-medical items not covered by insurance, such as special protective clothing or bicycles that help injured children exercise arms and legs.

Information for Residents:

Ohio Fire Marshal Issues Clarification on “Sky Lanterns”

The Ohio State Fire Marshal’s Office has issued a clarification letter on the code requirements of “Sky Lanterns”, also commonly known as “Wish Lanterns”, “ChineseLanterns”, “Kong Ming Lanterns”, or any other similar devise which is set on fire and released to the atmosphere, allowing the burning object to drift uncontrollably.

Per the Ohio State Fire Marshal’s Office:

“To start, be advised that sky lanterns do not meet the R.C. §3743.01 based definition of a firework. Thus, consistent with guidance the State Fire Marshal (SFM) has received from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and definitions used in the Ohio Fire Code, sky lanterns in Ohio are considered flame effects. As a flame effect, the regulation of sky lantern devices is a part of the general fire safety sections of the Ohio Fire Code. See Ohio Administrative Code 1301:7-7-33 and Ohio Fire Code [OFC] §3311.
To use a flame effect in Ohio in front of an audience, a person must first have a flame effect exhibitor license (also known as a “Type III” license) issued by the State Fire Marshal (see OFC §3319). To conduct an actual display of a flame effect (either indoor or outdoor) in front of an audience (almost all uses of a flame effect), an exhibitor must obtain a permit from the local fire code official. These permits can only be issued and maintained if the display occurs in accordance with OFC §3311.

If a person does not comply with the licensure or display permit requirements, they are subject to citation under R.C. §3737.42 for violation of the fire code and civil penalties as described in R.C. §3737.51(B) and (C). Also, since these devices are not fireworks, R.C. §3737.51(A) applies instead of R.C. §3743.65 as the relevant criminal code statute. Per R.C. §3737.51(A) & R.C. §3737.99, it can be a 1st degree misdemeanor to violate the OFC. Thus, use of an unpermitted flame effect could also trigger significant criminal penalties (in a worst case scenario). Ohio also has criminal and civil prohibitions against negligent and intentional ignition/spreading of fires.

As for the sales, possession and storage of sky lanterns, the sale and storage of sky lanterns does not require the seller to have a specific license in Ohio and a purchaser does not need a license or permit to acquire or store such devices. However, again, a flame effects exhibitor’s license and a locally issued permit are required to display/use sky lanterns. And, as always, the Ohio Fire Code sets forth the general minimum standards for any possession and storage of flammable/combustible or otherwise hazardous items (regulations that are unlikely to be triggered by purchase, possession or storage of a small quantity of sky lanterns).

If you have any further questions about these matters, please contact Brian Whitten, Chief of Code Enforcement, via phone at 1-888-276-0303 or e-mail at Brian.Whitten@com.state.oh.us.”

Reminders:

The best way to dispose of paint or other chemical products is to use them according to the label directions. If you no longer have a use for the product, consider donating it to a neighbor, church group, or another charitable organization.

Never dispose of chemicals in your home drains or storm sewers.

Keep all chemicals in their original containers, with the label intact and safely locked away from children or pets. Specific questions about chemical disposal can be directed to the Cuyahoga County Solid Waste district office at (216) 443-3749.

Smoke detectors and Carbon Monoxide Detectors are required in all motels, hotels, apartments, boarding houses, dormitories, nursing homes and private dwellings of two or more families. They are also required in all single-family dwellings.

Open burning is prohibited in the City of Brook Park.

Hydrant flushing is scheduled to begin as weather permits. Neighborhoods where hydrant flushing is underway will be marked with signs posted at major intersections. Discolored water often appears for a short time after hydrants are serviced. This is not unusual and quickly returns to normal if you run your water for a few minutes.

Fireworks are illegal. They are also potentially dangerous. Leave the fireworks displays to the professionals.

Ohio Fire Marshal Issues Clarification on “Sky Lanterns”

The Ohio State Fire Marshal’s Office has issued a clarification letter on the code requirements of “Sky Lanterns”, also commonly known as “Wish Lanterns”, “ChineseLanterns”, “Kong Ming Lanterns”, or any other similar devise which is set on fire and released to the atmosphere, allowing the burning object to drift uncontrollably.

Per the Ohio State Fire Marshal’s Office:

“To start, be advised that sky lanterns do not meet the R.C. §3743.01 based definition of a firework. Thus, consistent with guidance the State Fire Marshal (SFM) has received from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and definitions used in the Ohio Fire Code, sky lanterns in Ohio are considered flame effects. As a flame effect, the regulation of sky lantern devices is a part of the general fire safety sections of the Ohio Fire Code. See Ohio Administrative Code 1301:7-7-33 and Ohio Fire Code [OFC] §3311.
To use a flame effect in Ohio in front of an audience, a person must first have a flame effect exhibitor license (also known as a “Type III” license) issued by the State Fire Marshal (see OFC §3319). To conduct an actual display of a flame effect (either indoor or outdoor) in front of an audience (almost all uses of a flame effect), an exhibitor must obtain a permit from the local fire code official. These permits can only be issued and maintained if the display occurs in accordance with OFC §3311.

If a person does not comply with the licensure or display permit requirements, they are subject to citation under R.C. §3737.42 for violation of the fire code and civil penalties as described in R.C. §3737.51(B) and (C). Also, since these devices are not fireworks, R.C. §3737.51(A) applies instead of R.C. §3743.65 as the relevant criminal code statute. Per R.C. §3737.51(A) & R.C. §3737.99, it can be a 1st degree misdemeanor to violate the OFC. Thus, use of an unpermitted flame effect could also trigger significant criminal penalties (in a worst case scenario). Ohio also has criminal and civil prohibitions against negligent and intentional ignition/spreading of fires.

As for the sales, possession and storage of sky lanterns, the sale and storage of sky lanterns does not require the seller to have a specific license in Ohio and a purchaser does not need a license or permit to acquire or store such devices. However, again, a flame effects exhibitor’s license and a locally issued permit are required to display/use sky lanterns. And, as always, the Ohio Fire Code sets forth the general minimum standards for any possession and storage of flammable/combustible or otherwise hazardous items (regulations that are unlikely to be triggered by purchase, possession or storage of a small quantity of sky lanterns).
If you have any further questions about these matters, please contact Brian Whitten, Chief of Code Enforcement, via phone at 1-888-276-0303 or e-mail at Brian.Whitten@com.state.oh.us.”

Fire & Safety Prevention:

SAFETY NOTES- Please remember to periodically practice E.D.I.T.H. (Exit Drills in the Home). Planning and practicing escape routes could help you get out safely and quickly in case of fire. Remember these important tips: Set up a family escape plan on paper. Know two ways out of any room. Pick a family meeting place outside your house. Call 911 from a neighbor’s phone. Always remember: GET OUT AND STAY OUT!! When your smoke detector alarms, get out safely and quickly, don’t hide, go outside to your family meeting place, count heads to make sure everyone is out, go to your neighbor’s to call 911 then stay out…do not go back into the fire.

SMOKE & CO DETECTORS- The Department has found that many of these devices have reached the end of their designed life span. If they have been manufactured more than 8 years ago, they are due for replacement. Remember to change the batteries in your smoke detectors at least twice a year (when you change your clocks- change your batteries!) and test the unit once a month. Our goal is to have a working smoke detector in every residence. If you cannot truly afford one, contact your councilman or the Director of Public Safety at 433-1300. A working smoke detector can save your life by giving early warning of a fire in your home. If you are physically unable to install or service your detectors, call the Fire Department for assistance at (216) 433-1215.

SEVERE WEATHER- The City of Brook Park maintains an outdoor siren alerting system. It is designed to alert anyone outdoors of possible danger approaching. The siren may mean severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, or other natural or man-made disaster. A test is performed each Saturday at Noon on the alert system. If the sirens are activated, residents should go indoors and tune to radio, television or NOAA weather radio for details. It is suggested that all residents have a supply of bottled water, non-perishable food, a battery-powered radio, flashlights and spare batteries available in case of any emergency. If severe weather is approaching, take shelter in the center of the lowest level of the structure. Stay away from outdoor walls and windows. Please do not call 911 when you hear the sirens. The 911 service is to be used for reporting emergencies only.